Voices of the Delta: Emily Moll Wood

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Emily Wood, Working Self-Portrait, 2018, watercolor and watercolor pencil on worn shirt, 13 x 28 x 2 inches

Working takes many forms, and it is how we spend so much of our waking hours. But what does it mean to work? I painted a self-portrait on one of my husband’s discarded “work shirts” to explore this question. For work, he wears one of these “work shirts” with a suit and tie and goes to an office. Am I “working” if I’m caring for a child at home and painting while naps, hopefully, happen? Am I “working” if I’m making art but not making a regular paycheck? Of course I am! But does society really think so? How does it affect others’ view and my own self-worth when sometimes it seems as though caring for kids and making art are not viewed as “work”?

The medium and surface used for this piece involves some control and some element of chance. I like to experiment with how watercolor paint spreads and/or the colors bleed together differently when using various types of fabrics as the surface. I enjoy the challenge of figuring out how to make the paint work – controlling it as much as the medium and surface will allow, but while also embracing the unpredictability of it. This is an appropriate metaphor to my life right now – raising small children while trying to maintain a career and grow as an artist. I’m learning to let go but finding ways to control what I can.

– Emily Moll Wood

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Voices of the Delta: Deb Peregrine

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Deb Peregrine, Bix, 2018, encaustic, 10 x 10 x 2 inches

Art class was my favorite. I won a summer scholarship to the Art Institute of Chicago, earning my first solo exhibition. Wandering the halls of the Art Institute at a young age affected me deeply. I wanted to become an Impressionist. One of my idols is Carl Krafft, an early 20th century Expressionist painter from Chicago. He traveled to the Ozarks to paint and started the Ozark Painters Society. When he passed in 1936, the Art Institute had an exhibition of his work. I can see Krafft’s influence in my paintings. I want my art to tell a story, to be viewer friendly, to inspire someone to pick up a brush or pen.

– Deb Peregrine

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Voices of the Delta: Jason Rankin

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Jason Rankin, Bend 4, 2018, graphite on paper, 50 x 38 inches

It is my intention to create art that is accessible to the greatest number of people. I feel that graphite pencils on paper is the most ubiquitous of all art forms, as almost everyone in the Western world has drawn with a pencil on paper at some point. My drawings are intended to express my personal concepts of beauty, mostly through human form and expression.  

My friend Katya has become my muse for most of my recent work, including the “Bend” series. This work is a collaboration between artist and model, allowing her to express herself in the way she chooses, while allowing me to express my own personal concepts of beauty via the human form.

– Jason Rankin

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Voices of the Delta: Carrie Ballinger Porter

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Carrie Ballinger Porter, Cracks in the Landscape I, 2018, Polaroid emulsion transfer with graphite, 6 x 12 x 1 1/2 inches

In my most recent work, Cracks in the Landscape Series, I have been focused on manipulating the agricultural landscapes that one sees on the eastern half of Arkansas. These works are first taken on a 1980’s era Polaroid Instant camera. After the image has developed, I take the actual photo apart and soak it. I then remove the film or skin on which the image sits and then place it carefully on basswood or other suitable backing. At this point the image can be moved, twisted, pulled or folded. Almost as if it were a piece of unique, delicate fabric. Working in this way it is difficult to predict what the image will do. Sometimes they break or tear sometimes not. I think the imperfections are what make these landscapes so inviting. These images are meant to capture a quietness and stillness of the landscapes they represent.

– Carrie Ballinger Porter

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Voices of the Delta: Alice Guffey Miller

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Alice Guffey Miller, Survivor Barbie and the Naked Truth, 2019, mixed media, 8 x 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 feet

Barbie, the Great American Icon, has become an artistic medium in several of my creations. This particular Barbie survived thousands of miles as a hood ornament before rising up to expose the naked truth about today’s America. Climbing out of the ruins, she lifts with her all the little people: the down-trodden, the marginalized, the others. Barbie’s ascension speaks of the survival of the Feminine over oppression and subjugation, a triumph of peace and love over strife and hatred. She is naked because truth is always naked: without pretense, show or shame.

– Alice Guffey Miller

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Voices of the Delta: Carol Hart

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Carol Hart, Big Changes in the Old Neighborhood, 2018, mixed media, 30 x 30 x 1 1/2 inches

Time just seems to stand still while I’m painting. I continue to be surprised and delighted at how painting both intrigues and engages me. I am an acrylic and mixed media painter and I paint with a sense of urgency.  I love experimenting with a variety of subjects, mediums and materials. I enjoy the challenge and joy of painting figures, landscapes, and abstracts. Regardless of the subject matter, I take an abstract approach, using bold bright colors, broad-brush strokes and frequently embellish my work with drawing and collage. I focus on the relationship between shapes and create the movement necessary to draw the viewer in and around the painting.  Once the process has started, I tend to paint instinctively looking for those unanticipated surprises to guide me.

– Carol Hart

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Voices of the Delta: John Green

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

John Green, Toys and a Book, 2017, drawn from life on an iPad, archival inkjet on rag, 12 5/8 x 17 3/4 inches

Some of my recent work is made with a stylus on an iPad. The tablet frees me to make finished work directly from subjects and in places where traditional paints are impractical or too conspicuous. This broadens the range of subjects from which the painter can work, unfiltered by photography or preparatory sketches.

The tools of digital painting have evolved to the point that they feel very natural to me. Still, I am quite conscious of many differences between the processes and products of painting digitally versus the use of physical pigments. Digital painting has no physicality and no fixed scale. Changes can be unmade and remade easily. There is nothing of the destructive quality intrinsic to traditional painting. My digital paintings are only paintings at all in that they are mark by mark constructions of an image on a flat plane.

I use software that does not affect qualities of traditional pigments. I prefer flat, unbroken pieces of color with no emulation of physical brushes or the slippage of wet paint. Even printed, these paintings should reflect that they were made on a computer.

– John Green

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Voices of the Delta: Jay Sage

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Delta 61, Delta 61, Delta Exhibition, Exhibitions, Museum, Voices of the Delta

Jay Sage, Keep Calm & Introspect, 2018, graphite, gunpowder and gold leaf, 24 x 24 inches

Jay Sage aspires to earn the title of artist, and he works hard to convey a broad spectrum of feelings. Feelings like loneliness, vanity, and even contentment. He paves a highway into the emotional world (visually) by creating empathy in the viewer. The use of vivid contrast, and his almost graphic style, creates a visual biography around the subject, showing who they are, and where they’ve been. His ever-changing body of work utilizes a vast array of mediums and textures (such as gunpowder, spray paint, gold leaf etc…), while putting classic subjects in a contemporary setting.

– Jay Sage

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