ArkansasGives: Support art in education today

Author: Maria DavisonFiled under: SupportLeave a Comment

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TODAY ONLY: Join us in celebrating the creativity and talent of Arkansas students by donating to ArkansasGives, a one-day giving event hosted by the Arkansas Community Foundation. Any donations made to the Arkansas Arts Center today will help us qualify for bonus dollars to support our statewide educational outreach programs, like the annual Young Arkansas Artists exhibition.

For more than 50 years, the Arkansas Arts Center’s annual Young Arkansas Artists exhibition has celebrated the creative achievements of elementary and secondary students across the state of Arkansas. The exhibition provides students with the inspiration to express themselves through the visual art and assists in the development of arts appreciation throughout the state.

Here’s a preview of the incredible artwork that will be included in the upcoming 56th Young Arkansas Artists, opening May 16, 2017.

Jackson Brown, “Slowly Slowly Draws the Sloth,” 1st Grade, Miss Selma’s Schools, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Olive Harrington, “The Phoenix,” 4th Grade, Sequoya Elementary, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Thomas Miller, “The Witch’s Curse-Spellbound Mountain of Water,” 3rd Grade, Don Roberts Elementary, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Gabby Reeves, “A View from Below,” 5th Grade, Western Hills Elementary, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Jada Parker, “Abandoned Secrets,” 8th Grade, Pottsville Junior High School, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Esteban Saavedra, “La Esencia de Venecia (The Essence of Venice),” 9th Grade, Green Forest High School, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

 

Carrera Abel, “Max the Muss,” 10th Grade, Mountain Home High School Career Academies, 56th Young Arkansas Artists, 2017

Like what you see? Support Young Arkansas Artists, and programs like it, by donating until 8 p.m. today. Your donation to ArkansasGives will enable us to expand our educational outreach, like Young Arkansas Artists to even more communities across our state, ensuring that learning, inspiration and creative expression in the arts flourish throughout Arkansas for people of all ages and backgrounds. And don’t miss the 56th Young Arkansas Artists – open May 16 through July 23, 2017.

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ArkansasGives: Support art in education this week

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: SupportLeave a Comment

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This Thursday, join us in supporting the arts in education by donating to ArkansasGives, a one-day giving event hosted by the Arkansas Community Foundation. Any donations made to the Arkansas Arts Center on April 6 will help us qualify for bonus dollars to support our statewide educational outreach programs, like the annual Young Arkansas Artists exhibition.

For more than 50 years, the Arkansas Arts Center’s annual Young Arkansas Artists exhibition has celebrated the creative achievements of elementary and secondary students across the state of Arkansas. The exhibition provides students with the inspiration to express themselves through the visual art and assists in the development of arts appreciation throughout the state.

Here’s a look at some of the incredible artwork included in the 55th Young Arkansas Artists exhibition, which was on view May 6 through July 24, 2016.

Terry Akins, “Zoe,” Bergman Elementary School, 1st Grade, 55th Young Arkansas Artists, 2016

 

Maddie Eid, “Puppy,” Art4Kids at the Sherwood Rec, 6th Grade, 55th Young Arkansas Artists, 2016

 

Denver Evans “Myself,” Jonesboro Public Schools, 7th Grade, 55th Young Arkansas Artists, 2016

 

Daniel Mendoza Lopez, “Three Sides of Me,” Parkview Arts/Science Magnet, 9th grade, 55th Young Arkansas Artists, 2016

 

Makayla Allen, “Fresh,” North Little Rock High School, 11th Grade, 55th Young Arkansas Artists, 2016

Put giving on your calendar for  this Thursday, April 6, and help make future Young Arkansas Artists exhibitions possible. On the day, visit ArkansasGives.org between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to make a donation in support of the Arkansas Arts Center. ArkansasGives requires all gifts to be made online to qualify, and the minimum gift is $25. The entire dollar amount of your donation will be provided to the Arkansas Arts Center, and those donations will help us qualify for bonus dollars. All participating nonprofits will receive a portion of a $250,000 bonus pool, but the more we raise relative to the other participating groups, the larger the share of bonus dollars we will receive. Your donation to ArkansasGives will enable us to expand our educational outreach, like Young Arkansas Artists to even more communities across our state, ensuring that learning, inspiration and creative expression in the arts flourish throughout Arkansas for people of all ages and backgrounds.

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Five Women Artists to Know

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: Collection, MuseumLeave a Comment

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This Women’s History Month, we’re celebrating by featuring women artist in the Arkansas Arts Center Collection. Along with the National Museum of Women in the Arts and museums around the country, we’re looking at the women artists in our collection and their contributions to the field. Here is a look at the work five women artists, spanning the last 200 years, that show the incredible talent of women artists represented in the Arkansas Arts Center Collection.

Berthe Morisot, Le Flageolet (The Flute)

Berthe Morisot was one of the very few women at the center of the Impressionist circle, exhibiting at the “Exhibition of Impressionists” in 1874 with Cezanne, Renoir, Monet and Degas. In France, Impressionism was a sweeping movement – and one that would go on to shape French art for decades. Morisot’s work gained the respect of her male counterparts in the Impressionist circle, a difficult feat at the turn of the 20th century. However, she was often barred from the spaces and subjects men had access to – bars, cabarets and cafes – and so often depicted in their work. Morisot instead turned to spaces that men didn’t have access to, creating beautifully intimate scenes of female and domestic life.

Berthe Morisot, French (Bourges, France, 1841 – 1895, Paris, France), Le Flageolet (The Flute), 1890, oil on canvas, 22 1/2 x 34 5/8 inches, On loan from the Jackson T. Stephens Charitable Trust for Art. XL.2000.001.003

Georgia O’Keeffe, From Pink Shell

No history of American modern art can be written without Georgia O’Keeffe. Often called the “Mother of American modernism,” she was even well known in her own time, breaking barriers that few female artists before her had achieved over the course of her 70-year career. Her 1946 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art was the museum’s first major retrospective featuring a woman. While she is perhaps best known for her grand depictions of abstracted flowers, O’Keeffe found inspiration all over the natural world. Later in her career, as she began to spend more time in New Mexico, she drew inspiration from petrified shells and bones she found while walking in the desert.

Georgia O’Keeffe, American (Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, 1887 – 1986, Santa Fe, New Mexico), From Pink Shell, 1931, pastel on paper laid down to board, 14 1/4 x 10 5/8 in., Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection: Bequest from the estates of Louise and Fred Dierks. 2012.008.009

Irene Rice Pereira, The Circumnavigation of the Rose

Irene Rice Pereira was a pioneering member of the Abstract Expressionists. Influenced by the ideas of the Bauhaus, I. Rice Pereira, as she was known, believed firmly in the role of abstraction in the future of art. In 1953, Pereira was granted a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. It was one of the first two major retrospectives devoted to the work of a female artist – the other being painter Loren MacIver. Circumnavigation of the Rose is a beautiful example of the very abstract, conceptual work Pereira was producing at the time she was granted that exhibition. The title, The Circumnavigation of the Rose, refers to the compass rose and has to do with the artist’s spiritual journey through life. She explored these ideas both in her paintings and in her unpublished autobiography “Eastward Journey,” which was written in 1953.

And, if you just can’t get enough of this beautiful painting, try it in cake form. The dessert menu at Canvas restaurant includes a chocolate Nutella cake with buttercream frosting painted to look just like The Circumnavigation of the Rose.

Irene Rice Pereira, American (Boston, Massachusetts, 1902 – 1971, Marbella, Spain), The Circumnavigation of the Rose, circa 1950s, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches, Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection: Gift of Wanda Rock. 1981.038.001.

Louise Nevelson, Tide Garden IV

American sculptor Louise Nevelson is perhaps best known for her large-scale wooden assemblage works. Working from influences ranging from Pablo Picasso to Marcel Duchamp, Nevelson used manipulated and found materials – often found on the streets of New York – to craft work that is recognizable, yet abstract. As one of the first women working in large-scale installations, Nevelson’s work was often not favored by critics. However, her work in this field would go on to influence generations of women sculptors and feminist artists.

Louise Nevelson (Kiev, Russia, 1899 – 1988, New York, New York), Tide Garden IV, 1964, wood construction painted black, 91  x 140  x 10 inches, Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection: Gift of Sidney Singer, Sr., Stephens, Inc., Gerald Cramer, Martin Oppenheimer, Edward Rosenthal, and John Rosenthal. 1983.030

Wendy Maruyama, Rohwer and Jerome from The Tag Project

Trained as a furniture maker, Wendy Maruyama also works as a sculptor, creating large installations, often as commentary on social or political events. Rohwer and Jerome are from The Tag Project, a group of 10 sculpture, each representing one of the 10 Japanese American Relocation Centers where poeple of Japanese ancestry were held during World War II. To create each piece, Maruyama and her team methodically recreated the identification tags given to nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans using the rosters of internees housed in the archives of the War Relocation Authority, then tied together to hang from the ceiling. Evocative of a grove of trees or a group of people, the sculptures rustle or murmur as they rotate, returning a voice to a once voiceless populace. Most recently, Maruyama completed The wildLIFE Projectwhich explores the effect of poaching on wildlife populations.

Featured: Wendy Maruyama, American (La Junta, Colorado, 1952 – ), Rohwer (The Tag Project) and Jerome (The Tag Project), 2011, tea- and coffee-stained cut paper, ink, string, thread, and metal, 144 inches x 24 inches, Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection: Gift of the artist.

Who are your favorite women artists? Let us know in the comments.

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ArkansasGives: Support art in education

Author: Arkansas Arts CenterFiled under: SupportLeave a Comment

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On April 6, the Arkansas Arts Center is encouraging patrons to support art in education by donating to ArkansasGives, a one-day giving event hosted by the Arkansas Community Foundation. Any donations made in honor of the Arkansas Arts Center on April 6 will help us qualify for bonus dollars to support the statewide educational outreach of the Young Arkansas Artists exhibition.

For more than 50 years, the Arkansas Arts Center’s annual Young Arkansas Artists exhibition has celebrated and promoted the creative achievements of elementary and secondary students across the state of Arkansas. The exhibition not only provides students with the inspiration to express themselves through the visual arts, but is vital to the development of arts appreciation throughout the state. By providing an outlet for creative expression, the Arts Center reinforces the crucial role in art plays in the classroom.

The 56th Young Arkansas Artists, opening May 16, will feature selected artworks in a wide range of artistic mediums and techniques: from the outpouring of youthful expression to more sophisticated works from higher grade levels. The exhibition brings together artists from all over the state, providing them an opportunity to receive inspiration from their peers – and even compare techniques. After the exhibition closes at the Arts Center, selections from the exhibition travel the state, stopping in schools, hospitals and other venues around Arkansas. YAA on Tour showcases the talent of Arkansas’ youth and inspire young artists to achieve – and perhaps exceed – the talent of their peers in the pursuit of a lifelong relationship with the arts.

Put giving on your calendar for April 6, 2017. On that day, visit ArkansasGives.org between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to make a donation in support of the Arkansas Arts Center. ArkansasGives requires all gifts to be made online to qualify, and the minimum gift is $25. The entire dollar amount of your donation will be provided to the Arkansas Arts Center, and those donations will help us qualify for bonus dollars. All participating nonprofits will receive a portion of a $250,000 bonus pool, but the more we raise relative to the other participating groups, the larger the share of bonus dollars we will receive. Your donation to ArkansasGives will enable us to expand our educational outreach, like Young Arkansas Artists to even more communities across our state, ensuring that learning, inspiration and creative expression in the arts flourish throughout Arkansas for people of all ages and backgrounds.

 

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Meet the Speaker: Bridgette Fedak, Lilly Pulitzer

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Meet Lilly Pulitzer designer Bridgette Fedak. As part of our Art of Fashion series, she is giving a lecture about her background and her role at Lilly Pulitzer on April 1. Following the lecture, enjoy a fashion show, Lilly Pulitzer Pop-Up Shop, sponsored by Dillard’s, Park Plaza Mall, and themed lunch specials at Canvas restaurant.

What’s your current role in fashion?

Bridgette Fedak

Currently my title is Senior Associate Fashion Designer of Women’s Woven Dresses, Embellishments and Sample Room Coordinator at Lilly Pulitzer. I design the woven dresses (the ones that typically don’t stretch), as well as the top applied embellishments that we use. In addition to this, I co-coordinate our in-house Sample Room – I keep the flow of work organized for them, monitor fabric inventory, assist in getting what my Sample Room team needs from the other various teams, etc.

How did you first become interested in fashion?

I first became interested in fashion when I lived abroad in Switzerland. I was in high school, and brands were a big deal no matter your age. Looking around, I saw kids carrying Louis Vuitton accessories, there were collisions in the hallway when two girls were wearing the same outfit from the same store, etc. Fashion became so obtainable. I quickly realized that fashion was the ultimate way to express yourself. I began paying more and more attention to it and paid less and less attention in classes such as physics.

What role does art play in your work in fashion?

It plays a huge role. We are always looking for exhibits we can go to as a little getaway from the office! Every time we have an inspiration shopping trip to New York, we look up what exhibitions are going on that we would like to add to the itinerary. Fashion often looks back to vintage as well. There are often wonderful fashion exhibitions popping up that recognize historical periods of dress, some by famous designers and some not. Some designers also turn to historical paintings and take more literal approaches to re-create those paintings in their designs. There is really no limit to what can inspire and develop a garment.

Where do you find inspiration for your designs?

EVERYWHERE! There is absolutely no limitation to where we can find inspiration! In the past, before working for Lilly, I remember taking a picture of the movement of water in a fountain, another picture of Spanish moss in a tree and turning those pictures into prints that I had printed on fabric and made into garments. For Lilly, we use anything from a picture found on Pinterest to pictures from our travels to many exotic places with beautiful colors, foliage and animals. We often shop markets all over the globe and even the local mall for inspiration. What makes designing different is that even when the work day is over, your job isn’t. Inspiration might be the sunset you see on your drive home. It might be writing the names of towns down on a scrap paper in the car on a personal road trip that can be used to name a dress later. It might even be the way a child is wearing her dress backwards! Our eyes are forever open.

This Art of Fashion Lecture is sold out. Ticket reservations are not required for the Lilly Pulitzer pop-up shop open from 12 – 2 p.m. or lunch at Canvas restaurant from 11–2 p.m. on April 1.

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Community Conversation with Studio Gang

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AAC Executive Director Todd Herman and Studio Gang founder Jeanne Gang answer questions from community members at Tuesday’s event.

At the first of many community conversations regarding the future of the Arkansas Arts Center, Studio Gang founder and principal Jeanne Gang shared insights on her firm’s philosophy regarding architecture and approach to design, focusing on the ways architecture can help people connect with each other and their environment.

Gang highlighted three of the firm’s previous projects – the Nature Boardwalk in Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, the Writers Theatre in Glencoe, Ill. and University of Chicago Residential Commons. While none of these projects are identical to the Arkansas Arts Center project in form or function, Gang noted that in each of these projects, the firm focused on connecting communities and environments, elements shared with the AAC project.

“This place is a strong community anchor, and it’s set in this park setting, which I think is really an important part of the project,” Gang said. “And it’s about bringing community together.”

The Nature Boardwalk in the Lincoln Park Zoo began as a project to create “an outdoor classroom” – place where students could come to learn about nature.

“Usually at the beginning of a project, we’ll step outside, zoom out a little bit to see what is the real issue that’s impacting that organization,” Gang said. “And here, even though they wanted the pavilion, which they got, there was also this other issue was the pond itself that was part of the site.”

The firm built a stationary, yet interactive, pavilion that allowed visitors and students to engage with the pond. They also set out to solve some ecological issues in the park, proposing a rehabilitation of the pond, along with landscaping and a boardwalk circling the space. The pavilion and boardwalk have since become a major attraction, drawing yoga classes, weddings and tourists to the Lincoln Park Zoo.

The Writers Theatre in Glencoe, Ill. Photo by Steve Hall (c) Hedrich Blessing.

The Writers Theatre in Glencoe, Ill. is home to a highly-regarded theatre company. Studio Gang was tasked with building a new theatre that would give the company the performance space needed, while also providing space for the audience to continue to connect even after the performances ended. The lobby space in the theatre is open and serves as gathering space before and after performances and for student groups. Since its opening, it has even become a place where students gather to study after school.

“In the one year that it’s been open, it’s been an anchor – they’ve sold out all their shows,” Gang said. “It’s allowing this theatre company to be who they really were meant to be. It really embodies their personality and it’s about contributing to this liveliness of the town.”

At the University of Chicago, Studio Gang was challenged to create an 800-bed residence hall and dining facility that connected the cloistered, Gothic-style campus with the city in the distance, while also helping students connect with each other. Using the idea of portals found in other campus architecture, Studio Gang created indoor and outdoor spaces that activated the plazas. They also created different gathering spaces that allowed for students to engage on different levels of community.

Community members in the audience were also invited to ask questions of the architecture team, along with Arkansas Arts Center Executive Director Todd Herman. Questions ranged from how to address issues of sustainability, especially in terms of green roofs and the ecology of the park to community outreach to the future of the historic Pike Fletcher Terry House to how to engage with all communities and constituencies across Little Rock and the state of Arkansas.

“Communities, we think both geographically and communities of different, diverse backgrounds, and so we want to approach all of those and get input from as many different community stakeholders as we can and community groups to understand what they’re looking for in an Arts Center and how we can serve the largest community that we possibly can. That’s really why we’re here and why we do what we do: We want to bring art to as many people as we can,” Herman said.

The Arkansas Arts Center announced in December the selection of Studio Gang as design architect for its upcoming building project. Studio Gang is an award-winning architecture and urbanism practice based out of Chicago and New York. Last week, the Arkansas Arts Center announced Polk Stanley Wilcox as associate architect for the project. Polk Stanley Wilcox has previously worked on a number of local projects, including the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, Heifer International Headquarters, the Arkansas Studies Institute and the recently opened Robinson Center expansion and renovation.

For more information about the history of the Arkansas Arts Center and this project, visit our website. As this project progresses, community members and Arkansas Arts Center patrons will continue to have opportunities to ask questions and provide input.

“We’re planning on having a number of outreach sessions to help us understand that community, but also to hear what people have to say,” Gang said. “What could that Arts Center mean to different communities and what’s preventing them from coming here?”

“What an Arts Center can do, and what museums often do – they are places where people can gather,” Herman said. “Artists often tackle and approach what can be difficult subject matter for what can be social issues and others. And museums often function as this place where people can come together and think about the more difficult issues facing society today in a safe and respectful place. And we want to create that kind of hub where people want to come and be and think in a broader scope.”

Watch Tuesday’s Community Conversation in full below.

Jeanne Gang also gave a TED Talk in October 2016 about how people engage with the spaces around them, and in turn with each other. Watch that talk here.

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Arkansas Arts Center announces associate architect

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The Arkansas Arts Center announced the selection of Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects as associate architect for its upcoming building project. Polk Stanley Wilcox will work in partnership with Studio Gang Architects on a reimagined Arkansas Arts Center. Studio Gang was selected as design architect for the expansion and renovation in December.

Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects is a programming, architectural, planning and interior design firm with offices in Little Rock and Fayetteville. They have experience working with clients in a variety of industries, including healthcare, nonprofit, cultural, education, corporate and worship. Polk Stanley Wilcox also focuses on sustainability and creating buildings that operate on minimal energy usage.

“We are thrilled to partner with the Arkansas Arts Center and Studio Gang on this transformative project,” Polk Stanley Wilcox Principal David Porter said. “AAC has cast an exciting vision to rethink not only how the Center upgrades the interior and exterior spaces, but how the AAC connects to and enriches the broad arts and cultural tapestry of Little Rock. Studio Gang is a uniquely talented firm to lead the design effort. PSW is honored to bring our extensive experience from years of important projects in downtown Little Rock to come alongside them and the AAC to help create this next critical milestone for the city, state and region.”

Polk Stanley Wilcox has previously worked on a number of local projects, including the William J. Clinton Presidential Library, Heifer International Headquarters, the Arkansas Studies Institute and the recently opened Robinson Center expansion and renovation.

“We look forward to working with the team at Polk Stanley Wilcox,” said Studio Gang Founding Principal Jeanne Gang. “We hope to build on their strong history of collaborations in the area and believe that their knowledge of Little Rock will be a huge asset as we expand the impact of the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock, and in the region.”

Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects was selected from among three finalists to work in partnership with Studio Gang. Ten local firms responded to the RFQ issued last month. Allison and Partners and Cromwell Architects were also finalists.

The three finalist firms presented to the selection committee on February 16. The selection committee for the associate architect included AAC Executive Director Todd Herman, three representatives from Studio Gang, and international museum consultant Deborah Frieden, and AAC Board member Sara Hendricks Batcheller.

“Each of the finalists are strong, well-respected firms,” Arts Center Executive Director Todd Herman said. “Ultimately, Polk, Stanley, Wilcox was the best complement to Studio Gang in terms of experience and strengths. Their work at Robinson auditorium – similar in both scope and complexity – will be an asset as we move through the project. We are very pleased to have PSW on board for this important project that will create wonderful new spaces for the people of Little Rock and Arkansas to enjoy the arts. Having our architectural team in place is a major milestone. We are very excited to move the project forward.”

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Now on View: Sculptures from “The Tag Project”

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The installations mark the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, issued on February 19, 1942.

Wendy Maruyama, American (La Junta, Colorado, 1952 – ), Rohwer (The Tag Project) and Jerome (The Tag Project), 2011, tea- and coffee-stained cut paper, ink, string, thread, and metal, 144 inches x 24 inches, Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection: Gift of the artist.

The Arkansas Arts Center recently acquired Rohwer and Jerome, two sculptures from The Tag Project by Wendy Maruyama. The two large installations are now on view at the Arkansas Arts Center.

Rohwer and Jerome are two of 10 pieces originally created as part of The Tag Project, each piece representing one of the 10 Japanese American Relocations Centers where people of Japanese ancestry were held during World War II. Rohwer and Jerome were two such camps, both located in southeast Arkansas. These sculptures represent the 16,000 people held at Rohwer and Jerome between October 1942 and November 1945, 64 percent of whom were American citizens.

“The Tag Project was started in New York, while I was an artist-in-residence at SUNY-Purchase. I was inspired by the thousands of folded origami cranes I saw 12 years before at the Hiroshima Peace memorial…All Japanese Americans from the West Coast were rounded up in 1942 and each was issued a tag and an ID number designating their destination: one of several internment camps, all in desolate deserted areas of the United States…I was taken by the physical weight of these tags when they were completed and hung, despite appearing to be light and airy. This struck me as being very relevant to the way the internment was perceived by the general American public. To this day it shocks me to still run into fellow Americans who had no clue that this had happened,” Maruyama said.

For The Tag Project, Maruyama and her team methodically recreated the identification tags given to nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans using the rosters of internees housed in the archives of the War Relocation Authority. They began by stamping each tag to replicate the appearance of the original tags. They then handwrote the name of a Japanese American internee, their unique identifying number, and the name of the camp to which they were ordered to report. The team bent and folded the tags, later placing them in a bath of coffee or tea to artificially age their appearance. Once fabricated, the artist then tied the tags with red cord to a steel armature, and the whole grouping hangs from the ceiling. Each sculpture is nearly 11 feet tall and weighs more than 50 pounds. In Maruyama’s words, “each group hovers or levitates on its own. They all look like large, looming ghost-like figures and they slowly rotate or move with the slightest breeze.” Perhaps also evocative of a grove of trees or a group of people, the sculptures rustle or murmur as they rotate, returning a voice to a once voiceless populace.

“I decided to donate Rowher and Jerome to the Arkansas Arts Center because I know the institution will give this work the needed visibility with respect to the two incarceration camps in Arkansas. I find it curious that two camps were located so far from the others, and in the South, no less.  Executive Order 9066 has become a part of Arkansas history, and connected to a much larger story especially during these trying times now,” Maruyama said.

Sunday, February 19 marks the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1942, after the attack on Pearl Harbor caused public panic about an invasion by the Japanese army. With the stated goal of protecting against espionage and sabotage, Executive Order 9066 allowed for military exclusion zones and the forced relocation and internment of nearly 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry by their own government between 1942 and 1946.

Rohwer and Jerome were both exhibited at the Arkansas Arts Center in 2013 as part of The Tag Project/Executive Order 9066, an exhibition organized by the Society of Arts and Crafts in Boston. The exhibition explored the experience of Japanese Americans during World War II through photographs and objects alongside all 10 pieces from The Tag Project.

Installation view of The Tag Project/Executive Order 9066 at the Arkansas Arts Center in 2013.

The Butler Center for Arkansas Studies also has an exhibition related to the Rohwer and Jerome on view currently. The American Dream Deferred: Japanese American Incarceration in WWII Arkansas is comprised of paintings, drawings, and other works of art produced by individuals held at Rohwer and Jerome during World War II. It will be on display from January 13 through June 24, 2017, in the Central Arkansas Library System’s Butler Center’s Concordia Hall gallery located at 401 President Clinton Ave.

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